Green Climate

Green Climate

Green Climate

Green energy comes from natural sources such as sunlight, wind, rain, tides, plants, algae and geothermal heat. These energy resources are renewable, meaning they're naturally replenished. In contrast, fossil fuels are a finite resource that take millions of years to develop and will continue to diminish with use.
Renewable energy sources also have a much smaller impact on the environment than fossil fuels, which produce pollutants such as greenhouse gases as a by-product, contributing to climate change. Gaining access to fossil fuels typically requires either mining or drilling deep into the earth, often in ecologically sensitive locations.
Green energy, however, utilizes energy sources that are readily available all over the world, including in rural and remote areas that don't otherwise have access to electricity. Advances in renewable energy technologies have lowered the cost of solar panels, wind turbines and other sources of green energy, placing the ability to produce electricity in the hands of the people rather than those of oil, gas, coal and utility companies.
Green energy can replace fossil fuels in all major areas of use including electricity, water and space heating and fuel for motor vehicles.
Source:  S.A. ROGERS
Renewable energy is an important piece of the puzzle in meeting growing energy demandsand mitigating climate change, but the potentially adverse effects of such technologies are often overlooked.

Green Climate

Green Climate

Green energy defined

Green energy comes from natural sources such as sunlight, wind, rain, tides, plants, algae and geothermal heat.
These energy resources are renewable, meaning they’re naturally replenished.
In contrast, fossil fuels are a finite resource that take millions of years to develop and will continue to diminish with use.