Proboscis Monkey

Proboscis Monkey

Proboscis Monkey

Proboscis monkeys, called bekantan in Indonesia, and sometimes otherwise referred to as long-nosed monkeys, are endemic to Borneo, including all three nations that divide the island: Brunei, Indonesia, and Malaysia.
During Dutch colonization, proboscis monkeys were accorded an additional local moniker, “monyet belanda” (Dutch Monkey), reflecting the perceived resemblance to the Dutchmen’s portly bellies and bulbous noses.
Proboscis monkeys inhabit mangrove forests along rivers and estuaries, swamp-land, and lowland rainforest and rarely range more than .6 mi (1 km) from water.
They can also be found in wetlands that are not associated with the coast, such as swamp forests, limestone hill forests, rubber forests, and tropical heath forests.
Populations that are found inland usually gather along rivers. ​​
Since forested areas along waterways are those that are first habituated by people, proboscis monkeys live in some of the most threatened habitats in Borneo.
Source: New Primate Conservancy

Proboscis Monkey

Proboscis Monkey

 (Nasalis larvatus), long-tailed arboreal primate found along rivers and in swampy mangrove forests of Borneo.
Named for the male’s long and pendulous nose, the proboscis monkey is red-brown with pale underparts.
The nose is smaller in the female and is upturned in the young.
Source: Britannica