Tiger

Tiger

The largest of all the Asian big cats, tigers rely primarily on sight and sound rather than smell for hunting. They typically hunt alone and stalk prey. A tiger can consume up to 88 pounds of meat at one time. On average, tigers give birth to two to four cubs every two years. If all the cubs in one litter die, a second litter may be produced within five months.
Tigers generally gain independence at two years of age and attain sexual maturity at age three or four for females and at four or five years for males. Juvenile mortality is high however—about half of all cubs do not survive more than two years. Tigers have been known to reach up to 20 years of age in the wild.
Males of the largest subspecies, the Amur (Siberian) tiger, may weigh up to 660 pounds. For males of the smallest subspecies—the Sumatran tiger—upper range is at around 310 pounds. Within each subspecies, males are heavier than females.
Like most wild animals, tigers face challenges as they are being forced to survive in an unnatural environment where the population of potential prey is also deficient. The occupation of the land leads many species of animals (i.e., a potential prey of tigers) to relocate or even perish as a result of the loss of resources. As the number of their prey continue to decrease, so will the number of tigers.

 

Tiger

Tiger

The best places to see tigers in the wild

With as few as 3890 tigers left in the wild, the thrill of spotting one of these rare and elusive predators in their natural habitat is simply unmatched.