Owl

Owl

Owl

In 1884 the last Danish Eagle-owl was shot in central Jutland. Not until 100 years later the giant owls carefully returned. A single pair started breeding in 1984 in the most southern part of Denmark, close to the German border. Since then the eagle owls have taken back their lost land and have practically invaded the peninsula of Jutland.
Eagle Owls have benefited from large-scale reintroduction or reinforcement programmes in Europe. In Germany during the 1970s and 1980s, 1,500 birds were released and the species is now a widespread breeder in Schleswig-Holstein – just south of the Danish border.
In the laters years the giant owls have migrated into Denmark. It is estimated that about 120 pairs now are breeding in Jutland, Denmark. The Eagle-owls seem to do well in most types of habitat if there are available nesting spots and adequate prey.
Source: Wild About Denmark

 

Owl

Owl

Owls are beautiful animals—though not often seen because they are most active after dark.
Great Horned Owls, Barn Owls, and Screech Owls are among the more common species seen in North America, and they fly silently through the night while hunting prey.
Source: Hungry Owl Project