Bees

Bees

Bees

Bees

Why are bees good pollinators?

Bees make excellent pollinators because most of their life is spent collecting pollen, a source of protein that they feed to their developing offspring.
When a bee lands on a flower, the hairs all over the bees' body attract pollen grains through electrostatic forces.
Stiff hairs on their legs enable them to groom the pollen into specialized brushes or pockets on their legs or body, and then carry it back to their nest.
Individual bees tend to focus on one kind of flower at a time,
which means it is more likely that pollen from one flower will be transferred to another flower of the same species by a particular bee.
Many plants require this kind of pollen distribution, known as cross-pollination, in order to produce viable seeds.
The business of collecting pollen requires a lot of energy, and so many flowers attract and also reward bees with nectar, a mixture of water and sugars produced by plants.
Source: Michigan State University

Pollinators including birds

Busy as a bee

Pollinators including birds, bats, and bees pollinate fruits, vegetables, and other
crops that provide us with food, fiber, drugs, and fuel.
In addition to pollinating food crops like apples, almonds, and pumpkins,
bees pollinate forage crops including alfalfa and clover that provide feed for cattle and other animals.
Source:NRDC