Black Rhino

Black Rhinos

Black Rhino 

Black Rhinos were once found throughout sub-Saharan Africa with the exception of the Congo Basin.
Even though they are largely solitary animals, they were once so plentiful that it was not unusual to encounter dozens in a single day.
However, relentless hunting by European settlers saw their numbers quickly decline.
By the end of the 1960s, they had disappeared or mostly disappeared from a number of countries, with an estimated 70,000 surviving on the continent.
And then they were hit by a poaching epidemic, which started in the early 1970s -
effectively eliminating most black rhinos outside conservation areas as well as severely reducing their numbers within national parks and reserves.
About 96% of black rhinos were lost to large-scale poaching between 1970 and 1992.
In 1993, only 2,475 black rhinos were recorded.
But thanks to successful conservation and anti-poaching efforts, the total number of black rhinos has grown to around 5,000.
The species is currently found in patchy distribution from Kenya down to South Africa.
However, almost 98% of the total population is found in just 4 countries: South Africa, Namibia, Zimbabwe and Kenya.
There are three subspecies after the West African black rhino was declared extinct in 2011
Source   /   WWF  Global

Black Rhino

Black Rhino

Black Rhinos are the smaller of the two African Rhino species.
The most notable difference between white and black rhinos are their hooked upper lip.
This distinguishes them from the white Rhino, which has a square lip.
Black rhinos are browsers rather than grazers, and their pointed lip helps them feed on leaves from bushes and trees.
They have two horns, and occasionally a third, small posterior horn.
Source: World Wild Life